Category Archives: Archery

Sighting Options: Going Solo (Part 1)
by Joe Byers

A young man moved into my neighborhood and we quickly became friends when he saw the 3-D deer target in my back yard.  “I’ve always wanted to learn to bow hunt,” he remarked one day and I soon had him set-up. An athletic person, he grouped arrows in the heart of the kill zone consistently with just a few shots.  After practicing all summer, he was finally ready for opening day and I put him in my best treestand.  An hour after daylight a big doe walked down the trail at 20 yards and I heard the arrow launch and clang among the rocks.   “I forgot to look through the peep sight and missed by five feet,” he said later.  “I just got so excited when the animal showed up.”

We laugh about that first hunting episode today, yet my buddy’s experience typifies the intense excitement that archers face at the moment of truth.  With adrenalin pumping, it’s easy to act hastily, especially with multi-pin sights.  Vertical archers usually remember to use their peep sight, yet getting confused with multiple pins is common.  The solution is remarkably simple and so low-tech that many archers overlook the possibility—use a single-pin sight.

Speed and Technology

Single-pin sights come in varying forms, yet in keeping with the “simpler-is-better” theme, select a sight with one pin or use a three-pin set-up and drop two of the pins to the bottom of the housing.  With today’s fast bows, sighting in at 25 yards results in an arrow that strikes a little high at 20 yards and a little low out to 30 yards providing an on-target hit without thought- literally a “no-brainer”.  Bow set-ups will vary and you need to experiment to see if this works for you.

TRUGLO STORM™ 3-Pin Bow Sight

Start with a good 3 pin sight and simply push two of the pins down out of the way. This gives you a single pin sight, with the option of going back to a 3-pin.

Prime Candidates for Single-Pin Setups

Single-pins are ideal for special situations such as:

New Hunters- Pin confusion can be a real challenge for new bowhunters and simplifying the sighting picture reduces stress at the moment of truth.  Use a range-finder to practice on a 3-D target and you will quickly learn the arc of your arrow.  If you hunt from an elevated stand, be sure to practice shooting at a downward angle.

Early Season– Most bow seasons begin long before the leaves start to fall and shots are often 20 yards or closer due to limited visibility.  As soon as you are safely buckled in, range in reference objects immediately and establish that 15-30 yard kill zone.  If that big buck suddenly steps out, you can quickly and confidently aim and shoot.

Set-Ups- If you use scents, attractants, or other tactics that tend to focus deer at a specific spot, set that attractant at your 25 yard sight-in spot.  This also allows a little extra distance from your stand or blind so that movement is less detectable when coming to full draw.

Visual Acuity- Multiple pins can become difficult for archers who wear glasses or have less-than-perfect vision.  One single dot is easier to focus on and you can opt for a TFO (Tritium/Fiber-Optic) sight pin, which doesn’t require batteries and literally glows in the dark.

Tritium + Fiber-Optic Pin

TFO pins stay illuminated in any lighting condition, including complete darkness!

Other Single-Pin Options

TRUGLO Pendulum Bow Sight Pendulum sights automatically adjust for distance and allow a hunter to aim low-in-the-shoulder in case the deer ducks at the sound of release.  Pendulum sights don’t use strings, batteries, or gizmos to work, so you don’t have to worry about mechanical failure.  Gravity and mathematics drive this cool invention and they rarely fail.

 

TRUGLO Range Rover Single Pin Bow Sight

Archer’s Choice RANGE ROVER

Adjustable Range- Many 3-D shooters use a single-pin and a dial to adjust the sight for a specific range.  You can still use the 25-yard dial-in for close-in action with the ability to shoot at longer range without hold-over.  Additionally, you can use your hunting sight on the 3-D range and be ready for game at any distance.  Most archers practice at distances much longer than normal hunting shots, which forces them to fine-tune their form.  When you can ace a 12-ring at 50 yards, a buck at 30 yards becomes a piece of cake.

Single-Pin vs. Multi-Pin Bow Sights
By Rob Reaser

Forget the arguments. Bow sight selection comes down to personal hunting style.

We all like a good controversy, especially when it helps to pass a long evening in hunting camp or a rainout at the 3D range.

Today, one of bowhunting’s hottest “issues of passion” involves bow sights; specifically, whether single-pin “slider” sights or conventional multi-pin sights are best for bowhunting.

The truth is, both single-pin (or single-dot) sights and multi-pin sights are ideal for bowhunting, so don’t get drawn into the argument of which is best. Both will help you put an arrow in the kill zone. The real question is, “Which one is best for you and your style of bowhunting?”

Since you can’t take a new sight out for a thorough test drive, we want to discuss both sight designs, explain the advantages and caveats of each, and explore the hunting applications they are most suited for. With this information, you can make an informed bowhunting sight purchase for the upcoming season.

The Basics

Rob Reaser Carbon HybridMulti-pin sights have been around since the resurgence of modern archery. Although the current crop of sights, with their lightweight bodies and advanced fiber-optics, are light years ahead of the old-school designs, they still work on the same principle of multiple pins providing point-of-impact aiming for established distances. A typical multi-pin sight will have four to six adjustable pins enclosed in a circular housing. The shooter sets each pin to a specific distance. Most bowhunters set the top pin for 20 yards, the second pin for 30 yards, and so on. You can adjust windage (left and right) by moving the sight housing left or right, or adjust elevation by moving the individual pins up or down. Simple stuff.

 

rob reaser TG700_LSingle-pin sights are as the name implies. There is only one aiming reference, yet this reference provides point-of-impact sighting throughout a bowhunter’s effective lethal range—from close up to around 100 yards. Setup can vary between models, but generally you sight the bow in for 20 yards and 40 yards and mark the sight bracket accordingly. Next, select a pre-calculated yardage tape where the selected 20- and 40-yard ticks line up with the 20- and 40-yard sight-in marks on the bracket. Because the yardage tape matches arrow drop at two points-of-impact (20 and 40 yards), you can move the yardage adjustment mechanism to any yardage point on the tape and be sure of your point-of-impact.

 

Advantages

Single-pin sights have become increasingly popular in recent years for several reasons, most notably for their ability to provide precise point-of-impact at variable distances. If you range a deer at 46 yards, simply adjust the sight to the 46-yard mark and you’re on target. Another big advantage to single-pin sights is the reduced sight picture clutter. There is only one pin or dot within the sight housing, giving you a clear view of your target and any obstructions that might be in the way, such as tree limbs or brush.

With multi-pin sights, all of the pins will be visible in the sight picture, and you must be careful to select the correct pin for the distance you are shooting. The advantage of the multi-pin sight is that no adjustments to the sight are required prior to taking the shot. In a fast-changing hunting situation where your target is moving, target acquisition is quicker with a multi-pin sight than it is with a single-pin sight.

 

Caveats

Of course, the quicker target acquisition of multi-pin sights comes at a slight cost. Each pin is zeroed for a specific yardage, and that means shooting at a target between the sight-in yardages requires some practiced “guesstimating.” We call this “pin-gap sighting.” Taking our hypothetical deer at 47 yards, you’ll shoot slightly high if you aim with your 50-yard pin, and shoot a good bit low if you use your 40-yard pin. Through practice, you’ll learn how much over or under to hold at these in-between distances when using multi-pin sights. In this case, you would want to use your 50-yard pin and hold slightly under your intended point-of-impact.

rob reaser TG6401GB_LThe single-point sight, on the other hand, eliminates this challenge. Simply adjust your sight to the 47-yard mark on the bracket and you will be spot-on. The caveat is that you have to take time to adjust your sight pin. That’s fine if the deer is standing still and not looking at you; however, if the deer is moving about and changing its distance from you, you’ll need to readjust the pin as the situation demands. Fortunately, single-pin or single-dot sights, such as TRUGLO’s ARCHER’S CHOICE® RANGE•ROVER™ or RANGE•ROVER™ PRO, have an easy-to-use yardage adjustment wheel. This wheel lets you dial-in your sight quickly with just one hand and with minimal body movement.

 

Hunting Applications

While bowhunters use both single-pin and multi-pin sights for all hunting conditions, as we mentioned earlier, which style is best for you depends on your hunting style and the environment you typically hunt in.

Many bowhunters find the single-pin sight to be optimal for treestand or ground blind hunting when the targeting opportunities are controlled or predictable. An example would be when you know that deer approaching from direction X will present a shot opportunity at distance Y. Treestand and blind hunting also usually give the bowhunter more time and cover to make adjustments if the deer are moving.

One tactic single-pin enthusiasts sometimes use when hunting from treestands or ground blinds is pre-setting their pin for the average distance deer are likely to be. For example, by setting their pin for 25 yards and understanding (through practice) the arrow’s point-of-impact at 15 through 35 yards when using that 25-yard setting, they can adjust their hold-over or hold-under accordingly and not have to adjust the sight pin if the deer is within that range. Essentially, this is a spin-off of pin-gapping.

The other hunting application where the single-pin sight really shines is when the target tends to be at longer distances. Not only does a single-pin sight allow you to shoot from short to long distances without cluttering up your sight picture, you typically have more time to adjust your sight if an animal is at 70 or 80 yards. There is also less chance of spooking a game animal when you make the adjustment.

Although single-pin sights are quickly gaining popularity among experienced bowhunters, multi-pin sights continue to dominate the sport, and for good reason. Bowhunting is an unpredictable pursuit, as game animals rarely do exactly what you think or want them to do. While single-pin sights can provide that pinpoint, no-guess accuracy, many bowhunters feel more confident using multi-pin sights in close-quarters (under 40 yards), where there may not be time to make manual sight adjustments. Furthermore, a bit of gap-shooting practice will ensure that you know where your point-of-impact will be at those in-between yardages.

 

To Each His or Her Own

As you can see, there is no “better” or “best” when it comes to bowhunting sight selection. The right choice for you depends on your hunting style and the typical conditions in which you hunt. If you hunt in an environment where your target distance can change quickly and you have no trouble with pin-gap sighting, a multi-pin sight may be the perfect sight for you. If you are capable of shooting longer distances (such as when hunting elk or mule deer), or your hunting conditions allow you the time and cover to make the necessary manual adjustments, a single-pin “slider” sight could be your ticket.

 

And One More Thing…

While we’re on the subject of variable point-of-impact sights, you may want to consider a pendulum sight if you hunt exclusively from a treestand. Pendulum sights, such as the TRUGLO® Pendulum, automatically compensate for changes in distance when shooting from an elevated stand. This eliminates any holdover or holdunder guesswork that must be taken into account when shooting from an elevated platform with either a conventional single-pin or a multi-pin sight. Although the TRUGLO® Pendulum is made for shooting from a treestand (out to 35 yards), the pendulum can be locked in place and the sight used on the ground as a single-pin slider sight. In short, you get two sights in one (adjustable single-pin and pendulum).

 

TRUGLO Carbon Hybrid MicroTRUGLO® CARBON HYBRID™

State-of-the-art multi-pin sights, such as TRUGLO’s new CARBON HYBRID™, continue to be the sight of choice for bowhunters who are comfortable with pin-gap sighting and expect unpredictable hunting conditions. With its aluminum-carbon hybrid construction, durable metal pins, and bright light-gathering fibers, the CARBON HYBRID™ is the high-tech workhorse of the multi-pin sight world.

 

TRUGLO Range Rover ProTRUGLO® ARCHER’S CHOICE® RANGE•ROVER™ PRO

Whether you’re shooting 20 yards, 100 yards, or any distance in-between, a single-dot “slider” sight like the TRUGLO® ARCHER’S CHOICE® RANGE•ROVER™ Pro, will deliver true point-of-impact sighting. Simply range your target, adjust the sight to the distance marked on the sight bracket, and aim with confidence.

 

TRUGLO PENDULUMTRUGLO® PENDULUM

When shooting from an elevated stand, the TRUGLO® Pendulum automatically compensates for elevation angles out to 35 yards. Get on the ground and the pendulum can be locked into place, allowing you to use the sight as a conventional single-pin “slider” sight. You get the best of both worlds!

Choosing the Right Pin Size for Your Bow Sight 
By Brad Fenson

bck_Archery_RivalHunter

TRUGLO Rival Hunter Bow Sight

I can vividly remember my first bow and the sight that it came with. It was awkward compared to today’s standards, with brass pins fastened to the housing, the end of each pin tapered to a small ball which were painted different colors. The sight worked great and allowed me to harvest several animals early in my archery career and stressed just how advantageous the right sight pins can be.

TG500XB_L

BRITE•SITE XTREME by TRUGLO

You would be hard pressed to find a sight nowadays without some type of fiber-optic to gather and transmit light back to your eye. It allows for quick target acquisitions and more importantly makes the sight much more usable in low light conditions. The big question for most archers is what diameter of sight pins to choose. Sight pins usually come in three sizes .029, .019, and .010 inches. Obviously the easiest pin to focus and get on target would be the largest option. A good example of a sight with these larger diameter pins is the TRUGLO® BRITE•SITE™ XTREME, with 0.29 inch pins. It has been a favorite for tree stand deer hunters who are usually shooting shorter distances and looking for quick target acquisition. The larger pin diameter can also be advantageous for older eyes and people that are farsighted, that is, your quarry at any distance is easy to see, but the pin close up is hard to find and focus, making the larger the best option. The downside is that it often covers a larger area of your target, making it harder to fine tune arrow delivery.

 

 

bck_Archery_CarbonHybridMicro

TRUGLO Carbon Hybrid Micro

People that like hunting open country, or spot-and-stalk style of hunts, the medium-sized pin can be advantageous, as it provides a blend of quick target acquisitions with fine-tuned arrow placement. It is also easier to stack multiple pins in a sight. This is the most popular choice for hunters and when you look at quality sights, like the TRUGLO® CARBON HYBRID™ series, it comes preloaded with 0.19 inch pins in all four of its models.

The smallest diameter pins allow for precision arrow placement as you can often see your bull’s eye behind the pin. The downfall is they can be very jumpy as the sight pin moves with the slightest motion from the shooter. I feel the small diameter pins are for a more disciplined shooter with good style and form.

 

Most hunters and shooters have experience with a specific diameter pin and perhaps haven’t considered the options to make them more successful. If you have never looked at all three sizes at the same time, I’d strongly recommend you go into an archery shop and pick up TRUGLO’s RIVAL HUNTER, which is a sight that incorporates DDP (Decreasing Diameter Pin) Technology.  With TRUGLO’s patented DDP™ Technology, you get smaller pin sizes for longer distances as well as the larger pin sizes for close shots, providing the perfect solution for all hunting scenarios.  Another advantage of RIVAL HUNTER with DDP™ Technology is if you are farsighted, you may be able to reduce your frustrations of focusing on a pin while a big buck is coming down the trail.  The pin placement on a shot flows naturally with this technology.

Pick up some of the bows with mounted sights and see how quickly your eye focuses and picks up on the different pin sizes and styles

Point of Aim: Size Matters
By: Joe Byers

Scott Ellis w 147 Illinois whitetail

Scott Ellis takes his hunting adventures seriously and being on target spells the difference between success and failure. Ellis states, “When hunting turkeys and whitetail deer, having a definitive aiming point is critical,” and as a Prostaff member, he puts TRUGLO’s sighting systems to the test on the ground and from a tree.

A two time Grand National turkey calling champion, he completed his first single season Grand Slam and cumulative third Grand Slam of wild turkeys and several TRUGLO® products played a significant role in his success.   As the Prostaff Manager for WoodHaven Custom Calls and a member of Mossy Oak’s National Prostaff, you’d expect that he “talks turkey” with the best of them, yet he states “just because a gobbler is in range, doesn’t mean it can’t be missed.”

“I shoot the TRITON™ 28MM TRI•COLOR RED•DOT and love it,” he says.  “I’m one of those guys that believes ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ and not someone who tries every new gadget that comes along.”  “However, the tri-color dot optics have proven themselves time and time again, proving to be invaluable in my quest of the single season Grand Slam.  Also, at 30 yards the sight is parallax free, so wherever the dot shows in the sight, the pattern finds its mark.”

He began in Florida with an Osceola in mid-March at Florida Outdoor Experience in Chiefland, where mornings were really dark in the dense canopied oak hammocks of central Florida. The red dot shows up extremely well in those low light conditions.   He scored in Georgia with an Eastern and then moved on to Nebraska and Texas for the Merriam’s and Rio, respectively. The green dot provided a stark contrast with the neutral, beige dominate backdrops in the open terrain of the mid-west. Additionally, Ellis is a big fan of the 2.5 MOA dot, a feature found on the TRITON™.  The fine sight picture acquired with the smaller reticle allows for a larger margin of error, even if your aim is not perfect.

Nebraska Merriams (2) Florida Osciola

When hunting the wide-open spaces of Texas and Nebraska, he also commented on the performance of the TRU•BRITE™ OPEN-BRIDGE BINOCULARS that are as crisp and clear as any he’s used.  Once on a hunt many years ago, he spotted a flock of turkeys half a mile in the distance and finally worked himself within range only to identify that the flock was all hens.   “I learned that day the importance of quality optics and love the TRU•BRITE™ binos for clarity, size, and weight. Identifying game from long distances can save you valuable time on your hunt.”

Ellis, an avid archery whitetail hunter, also chooses TRUGLO® bow sights to aid his success.   “Never knowing when a longer shot will present itself, I practice out to 60-70 yards.  At those distances, pin size is very important.  I love the RIVAL™ HUNTER with the DDP™ (Decreasing Diameter Pin) Technology. This feature enables longer range pins to decrease in diameter, again creating a finer sight picture”   “Just as with the brightness control on the reticle of my TRITON™ turkey scope, the rheostat on my RIVAL™ HUNTER bow sight will seal the deal in low light conditions.  With any normal lighted bow sight, the uncontrolled brightness can blow out the sight picture, thus hindering the ability to make a good shot on your quarry. The rheostat controlled light on the RIVAL™ HUNTER allows me to regulate the illumination of the pin for optimal sighting. Low light conditions demand a very delicate balance of pin brightness versus ambient lighting.  Size matters at point of aim and smaller is better.


TRUGLO® is the world’s leading brand of fiber-optic and patented TFO (Tritium/Fiber-Optic) technology for the shooting sports industry. Born through innovation, TRUGLO® continually enhances the marketplace with advanced and revolutionary technology for shooters of all types. Based in Richardson, Texas, TRUGLO® celebrates over 20 years of offering cutting-edge accessories to shooters who are passionate about quality and clarity.

Giving back to an industry they love, TRUGLO® supports many conservation groups, youth programs, and organizations that promote the values they believe are necessary to guarantee the industry’s future.   TRUGLO®—When Brightness Counts!

Rival™ Hunter and DDP Technology

rival hunter archery sight

In January, we introduced Rival™ Hunter, a new and innovative archery sight series. The Rival™ Hunter series was a direct result of the highly successful and innovative Rival™ FX™ archery sight series introduced by TRUGLO® last year.

This new series combines some of TRUGLO’s most innovative features; lightweight, micro-adjustable, tool-less design that’s adjustable for left and right-handed shooters. Ultra-fine, stainless steel hardware allows the hunter extreme precision.

The stainless steel tube pin design features our patented DDP™ technology that provides a decreasing array of pin diameters for longer distances while blocking less of the target for more accurate aiming.

The Rival™ Hunter series is available with either 3 or 5 sight pins. Extra-long fibers are designed to achieve maximum brightness. Included is an adjustable second axis aperture and the level is illuminated with luminescent tape. The sight has markings for windage, elevation and pin adjustments for quick tuning. The reversible bracket provides greater vertical adjustability. TRUGLO’s TRU•TOUCH™ soft-feel technical coating also enhances the shooter’s experience.

truglo ddp

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